Pelvic mesh lawsuits: Internal Bard memo shows medical device company knew mesh was unfit for humans

June 26, 2013 by Brad Perriello

Recently unsealed documents in personal injury lawsuits filed against C.R. Bard over its transvaginal mesh implants show that company executives knew the plastic used in the mesh was unfit for implantation into humans.

Pelvic mesh lawsuits: Internal Bard memo shows medical device company knew mesh was unfit for humans

C.R. Bard (NYSE:BCR) ignored warnings that the plastic used in its transvaginal mesh implants was unfit for use in humans, according to court documents recently unsealed in personal injury lawsuits filed against the medical device company.

The manufacturer of the plastic used in Bard's Avaulta mesh implant for hernia repair warned that it wasn't suitable for implantation, according to the documents. Bard executives sought to conceal the use of the plastic from its manufacturer, a division of Chevron Phillips Chemical Co., according to the records.

"IMPORTANT ... these suppliers will likely not be interested in a medical application due to product liability concerns," Roger Darois, a vice president of research at Bard subsidiary Davol, wrote in a 2004 email. "We purchase our polypropylene monofilament from an extrusion supplier who purchases the resin directly from the resin manufacturers. Thus, it is likely that they do not know of our implant application. Please do NOT mention Davol's name in any discussions with these manufacturers. In fact, I would advise purchasing the resin through a 3rd party, not the resin supplier to avoid a supply issue once the medical application is discovered."

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