Hacking: Another year, another insulin pump maker outed on stage

August 1, 2013 by Arezu Sarvestani

Cybersecurity expert Jay Radcliffe discusses his experiences with Johnson & Johnson and its Animas subsidiary during the high-profile Black Hat conference in Las Vegas, demonstrating a "feature" of the Animas Ping insulin pump that he says is more of a flaw.

Hacking: Another year, another insulin pump maker outed on stage

Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) and its Animas subsidiary found themselves in the spotlight yesterday during 1 of the world's largest cybersecurity conferences, when well-known medical device hacker Jay Radcliffe demonstrated, live on stage, a "feature" of the Animas Ping insulin pump that Radcliffe says could harm or kill unsuspecting patients.

Before an audience of security experts, each of whom paid between $1,800 and $2,200 apiece to attend the Las Vegas conference, Radcliffe showed how the Ping insulin pump "forgets" its recent insulin dosing history when its battery is swapped.

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Radcliffe, a senior security analyst for InGuardians, described the issue as a problem, but Johnson & Johnson has maintained that it's a safety feature. Animas officials were supposed to be in attendance for a joint press conference with Radcliffe, but had to back out at the last minute due to a scheduling conflict, Radcliffe said.

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