MassDevice Q&A: American Well CEO Roy Schoenberg

November 11, 2009 by Brian Johnson

The web-enabled, on-demand healthcare service firm's chief on why 2009 will be a watershed year and the similarities between fundraising and warfare.

MassDevice Q&A: American Well CEO Roy Schoenberg

Roy Schoenberg seems to have the gift of good timing.

The 42-year-old is CEO of American Well, a Boston-based company that's developed a web-enabled, on-demand healthcare service so patients can speak directly to physicians at any time. The system could prove to be a low-cost solution to getting healthcare to the uninsured or under-insured — pretty fortuitous timing, when you consider Washington's struggle to figure out a way to control spiraling healthcare costs while increasing access to care.

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