Hacking healthcare: Would we know if a medical device was hacked?

August 26, 2013 by Arezu Sarvestani

The absence of reported hacks on medical devices doesn't mean they aren’t happening, experts say, because there are no mechanisms in place to detect them.

How would we know if medical devices had been hacked?

The FDA has made medical device cybersecurity a high priority, even as it stresses that there have been no reported incidents of malicious medical device hacks or of patients harmed by a security-related issue.

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