Banned in Boston

April 6, 2009 by Chris Markuns

Massachusetts enacted the nation's strictest law governing industry payments to physicians. What does the so-called "gift ban" mean for the Commonwealth's medical devices sector?

Say goodbye to the promotional pen

Pharma is sexy. Big drugs, big money, big news. In the life sciences arena, perhaps only biotech commands a higher political and public profile.

So it isn’t surprising that the medical device industry’s groundbreaking inclusion in Massachusetts’ new code of conduct garnered relatively little attention.

But the new rules governing industry payments to physicians — the so-called "gift ban" — include provisions aimed at curbing what some call undue and improper influence by medical device manufacturers.

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