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The innovator's challenge

August 8, 2013 by MassDevice

Dr. John Halamka, chief information officer for Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, summarizes the quality measures included in the meaningful use rules for electronic medical records.

Dr. John Halamka

By John D. Halamka, MD

I've written many blog posts about our efforts along the path to ICD-10 that will enhance our  inpatient clinical documentation. We're hard at work planning the improvements we think are foundational to support care coordination, compliance, and quality measurement goals.

The healthcare IT applications of Google Glass

July 23, 2013 by MassDevice staff

Dr. John Halamka, chief information officer for Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, explores the healthcare IT applications for GoogleGlass.

Dr. John Halamka

By John D. Halamka, MD

Last week I had the opportunity to test Google Glass.

It's basically an Android smartphone (without the cellular transmitter) capable of running Android apps, built into a pair of glasses.

The law of unintended consequences: Transparency rules may harm sickest patients | MassDevice.com On Call

June 24, 2013 by Sony Salzman

A study finds that doctors might avoid treating the sickest heart patients over concerns about new transparency and hospital labeling rules.

MassDevice On Call

MASSDEVICE ON CALL — A new study out of Brigham & Women's Hospital in Boston suggests that transparency rules might have negative consequences for very sick heart patients.

The study evaluated the frequency of coronary stent implantation in 116,227 Bay State patients, finding that "outlier" hospitals – pegged for having higher-than-average death rates – were less likely to accept the sickest patients.

Patient and family engagement in ICUs

May 23, 2013 by MassDevice

Dr. John Halamka, Chief Information Officer for Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, records his experiences with infrastructure, applications, policies, management and governance.

Dr. John Halamka

My father died 2 months ago and now with a bit of distance from that emotional event, it's time to further reflect on technology to support patients and families in ICUs. 

BIDMC has been speaking with a major foundation about creating a cross-disciplinary, multi-institutional, open source application to turn critical care data into wisdom for patients and families.

How might it work? Let me use my father as an example.