Category: St. Jude MedicalSyndicate content

MassDevice.com +3 | The top 3 med-tech stories for March 19, 2012.

March 19, 2012 by MassDevice staff

Kensey Nash jumps 20% on Angio-Seal settlement news, Covidien confirms its $300 million buyout of superDimension and Cameron Health's FDA panel date is good news for Boston Scientific.

Plus 3

Say hello to MassDevice +3, a bite-sized view of the top three med-tech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com's coverage highlights our 3 biggest and most influential stories from the day's news to make sure you're up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry.

If you read nothing else today, make sure you're still in the know with MassDevice +3.

Kensey Nash recoups on Angio-Seal settlement with St. Jude | Legal Roundup

March 19, 2012 by MassDevice staff

Shares of Kensey Nash are up 20% today on an agreement to settle a royalties dispute with St. Jude Medical, regaining what they lost – and then some – after KNSY restated its fiscal 2012 guidance last year; also, Baxter wins $24M decision over Fresenius; shareholders sue TranS1; and Carl Zeiss logs a win in patent fight with Signet Armorlite.

Kensey Nash
St. Jude Medical

Study: Heart hole closure no better than meds for preventing stroke | MassDevice.com On Call

March 15, 2012 by MassDevice staff

An international study concludes that a catheter-based procedure to close a hole in the heart may be no better at preventing recurrent strokes than medication alone.

MassDevice On Call

MASSDEVICE ON CALL — A catheter-based procedure to close holes in patients' hearts proved no better at preventing recurrent strokes than medication alone, according to a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Researchers compared use of NMT Medical's StarFlex septal closure system with drug therapy against drug therapy alone, concluding that there were no statistically significant differences in stroke prevention between the 2 options for patients with patent foremen ovale, a hole between the upper chambers of the heart.

MassDevice.com +7 | The top 7 med-tech stories for the week of March 5, 2012.

March 10, 2012 by MassDevice staff

Zimmer axes jobs ahead of the med-tech tax, MassDevice investigates the hack-able body and looks at the industry trends for the month of February, Moody's estimates the impact of the medical device tax while repeal efforts lack momentum in Senate, Boston Scientific signs a deal to acquire lead-less ICD maker Cameron Health in a deal worth up to $1.35 billion and Dr. Hauser points to St. Jude's Riata recall as evidence of the problem with the U.S.'s post-market surveillance systems.

Plus Seven

Say hello to MassDevice +7, a bite-sized view of the top seven med-tech stories of the week. This latest feature of MassDevice.com's coverage highlights our seven biggest and most influential stories from the week's news to make sure you're up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry.

If you read nothing else this weekend, make sure you're still in the know with MassDevice +7.

Moody's estimates med-tech tax impact

March 9, 2012 by MassDevice staff

Moody's Investor Services estimates that the impact of the medical device tax for the companies it covers will top $650 million.

MassDevice.com med-tech tax coverage

The 2.3% tax on revenues slated to go into effect next year for medical device makers could top $650 million for the med-tech companies covered by Moody's Investor Services, according to a report by the ratings agency.

The tax will help slow EBIDTA growth rates for the med-tech sector to between 1% and 4% over the next year to 18 months, according to Moody's, with organic growth rates of between 2% and 3% during that period.

MassDevice.com +3 | The top 3 med-tech stories for March 7, 2012.

March 7, 2012 by MassDevice staff

Zimmer axes jobs ahead of the med-tech tax, MassDevice investigates the rising clamor around hacking medical devices and St. Jude recovers from what 1 analyst deemed a "Greek tragedy."

Plus 3

Say hello to MassDevice +3, a bite-sized view of the top three med-tech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com's coverage highlights our 3 biggest and most influential stories from the day's news to make sure you're up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry.

If you read nothing else today, make sure you're still in the know with MassDevice +3.

The hack-able body: Are device makers doing enough to shield patients from hackers?

March 7, 2012 by Arezu Sarvestani

The threat that the fusion of humans and medical machines may leave patients vulnerable to the hackers and bugs of the digital world is beginning to resonate with device makers.

Laptop image

Karen Sandler was 31 years old, working at a non-profit organization providing free legal help to computer programmers, when she was diagnosed with an enlarged heart and informed that she'd need a machine to help keep her alive.

Her mother accompanied her the day a doctor recommended that Sandler undergo surgery to implant a medical device into her chest. He handed Sandler a pager-sized machine called a cardioverter defibrillator – a miniature, implantable equivalent of having EMTs follow her around all day with defibrillator paddles should her heart stop.