Category: NanotechnologySyndicate content

Life sciences key to North Carolina nanotechnology sector

March 31, 2011 by MedCity News

North Carolina’s nanotechnology sector may not be one of the country's largest, but the state's strong life sciences industry could provide it with significant growth potential.

Center of Innovation for Nanobiotechnology

North Carolina’s nanotechnology presence doesn’t immediately come to mind when thinking of the country’s biggest nanotech hubs, a skeptic of the industry recently told MedCity News.

In a way, he’s right, at least right now. Nanotechnology has found a comfortable home in manufacturing and industrial applications that were developed primarily at tech hubs in other parts of the country.

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Gates Foundation invests $10 million in vaccine firm Liquidia

March 4, 2011 by MassDevice staff

Liquidia Technologies, a North Carolina-based nanotech company, lands a $10 million equity investment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to support vaccine development.

Liquidia logo

Nanotechnology company Liquidia Technologies has received a $10 million equity investment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to support vaccine development and commercialization.

The financing follows the announcement last month of a collaborative agreement with the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative, which is working with Liquidia to develop next-generation malaria vaccines using the Morrisville, N.C.-based company’s nanotechnology methods.

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MassDevice Podcast: Nano Surfaces CEO Joe Gatto

February 25, 2011 by Brad Perriello

We're on the cusp of a significant new era in medical device design, Nano Surfaces CEO Joe Gatto tells MassDevice, in which their very surfaces will build themselves and be able to operate at the molecular level.

<p>Coming generations of implanted medical devices will interact with the human

Coming generations of implanted medical devices will interact with the human body at the molecular level, using sophisticated nano-coatings to not only thwart microbial growth but to perform biological operations.

That's the prediction of Nano Surfaces founder, president and CEO Joe Gatto. The Boston-based firm is developing technology it's licensed from Cornell University to create self-assembling, anti-microbial coatings on a nanotech scale — and Gatto says that's just the beginning. To prove it, he's hitting to road to raise a Series A round from institutional investors.

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Nanotechnology in tissue engineering: A view of medicine's future

January 16, 2011 by MassDevice

To mimic cells' physiologic features, scientists work at the nanoscale – creating structures at the range of 1 billionth of a meter, 100 times smaller than a red blood cell.

Nanotechnology in tissue engineering: A  view of medicine's future

By Tal Dvir

As tissue engineers, we seek to develop functioning substitutes for damaged tissues and organs. Generally, this means seeding cells onto 3-dimensional porous scaffolds made of biomaterials, which provide mechanical support and instructive cues for the developing engineered tissue. Now it’s time to go to the next level, and make complex tissues that can really do things (PDF) — contract, release growth factors, conduct electrical signals and more. Things our own cells and tissues do.

Semprus BioSciences closes $18 million Series B round

December 13, 2010 by MassDevice staff

Semprus Biosciences Corp. closes an $18 million Series B funding round, which CEO David Lucchino says it will use to build out its management team and fund manfuacturing ramp-up for its nanotech catheter coating.

Semprus logo

Semprus BioSciences Corp. reeled in $18 million in Series B financing for its nanotech medical device coating.

Semprus CEO David Lucchino told MassDevice that the company will use the proceeds to build a team of "been there, done that" medical device executives and to scale up its manufacturing operations.

"Investor expectations with this round of funding are that we would gain regulatory and clinicial clarity, along with having an initial product in hand to start initial sales. We're looking at the next 24 months as being that window," Lucchino told us.

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Audax scores Brown technology

December 9, 2010 by MassDevice staff

Audax Medical Inc. inks an exclusive license agreement with Brown University for Arxis, a biomaterial that the two are developing for regenerative medicine applications.

Audax logo

Audax Medical Inc. entered into partnership deal with Brown University for a nanotechnology-based biomaterial for regenerative medicine.

The licensing agreement gives the Littleton, Mass.-based company exclusive rights to Arxis, which is based on an organic osteobiologic developed at the university's School of Engineering and Dept. of Orthopedics.

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MedGadget's MedTech Monday: Scientists track air as we breath it

November 22, 2010 by MassDevice

Scientists track air as we breath it; computer mouse measures blood pressure; brain probe stimulates individual neurons, nanogenerators power implantable devices.

MedGadget's MedTech Monday: Scientists track air as we breath it

Scientists track air as we breath it: Investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the Harvard School of Public Health have been using a locally developed system to track near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles as they enter and leave the lungs.

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